Pelham: Edward Bulwer-Lytton

ISBN: 9781495908194

Published:

Paperback

268 pages


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Pelham:  by  Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Pelham: by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
| Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 268 pages | ISBN: 9781495908194 | 8.69 Mb

It will just redeem my diamonds, and refurnish the house, said Lady Frances. The latter alternative was chosen. My father went down to run his last horse at Newmarket, and my mother received nine hundred people in a Turkish tent. Both were equallyMoreIt will just redeem my diamonds, and refurnish the house, said Lady Frances.

The latter alternative was chosen. My father went down to run his last horse at Newmarket, and my mother received nine hundred people in a Turkish tent. Both were equally fortunate, the Greek and the Turk- my fathers horse lost, in consequence of which he pocketed five thousand pounds- and my mother looked so charming as a Sultana, that Seymour Conway fell desperately in love with her.

Mr. Conway had just caused two divorces- and of course, all the women in London were dying for him-judge then of the pride which Lady Frances felt at his addresses. The end of the season was unusually dull, and my mother, after having looked over her list of engagements, and ascertained that she had none remaining worth staying for, agreed to elope with her new lover. The carriage was at the end of the square. My mother, for the first time in her life, got up at six oclock.

Her foot was on the step, and her hand next to Mr. Conways heart, when she remembered that her favourite china monster and her French dog were left behind. She insisted on returning-re-entered the house, and was coming down stairs with one under each arm, when she was met by my father and two servants. My fathers valet had discovered the flight (I forget how), and awakened his master. When my father was convinced of his loss, he called for his dressing-gown-searched the garret and the kitchen-looked in the maids drawers and the cellaret-and finally declared he was distracted.

I have heard that the servants were quite melted by his grief, and I do not doubt it in the least, for he was always celebrated for his skill in private theatricals. He was just retiring to vent his grief in his dressing-room, when he met my mother.

It must altogether have been an awkward rencontre, and, indeed, for my father, a remarkably unfortunate occurrence- for Seymour Conway was immensely rich, and the damages would, no doubt, have been proportionably high. Had they met each other alone, the affair might easily have been settled, and Lady Frances gone off in tranquillity--those d-d servants are always in the way! I have, however, often thought that it was better for me that the affair ended thus, -as I know, from many instances, that it is frequently exceedingly inconvenient to have ones mother divorced.

I have observed that the distinguishing trait of people accustomed to good society, is a calm, imperturbable quiet, which pervades all their actions and habits, from the greatest to the least: they eat in quiet, move in quiet, live in quiet, and lose their wife, or even their money, in quiet- while low persons cannot take up either a spoon or an affront without making such an amazing noise about it. To render this observation good, and to return to the intended elopement, nothing farther was said upon that event. My father introduced Conway to Brookess, and invited him to dinner twice a week for a whole twelvemonth.



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